Dr. Alyssa Cady

Return to Clergy DR. ALYSSA CADY – Director of Center for Interfaith Dialogue Dr. Alyssa M. Cady is a scholar of Mediterranean religions in the Late Roman and Late Antique periods focusing on material culture, literature, and intellectual history. Her interests range widely and include monastic book production in Roman Egypt, patronesses of the early …

Rabbi Sarah H. Reines

Return to Clergy SARAH H. REINES – Rabbi Rabbi Sarah H. Reines grew up at Temple Emanu-El, where her family are long-time members and both of her parents were on the faculty of the religious school. She attended Hebrew school, celebrated her bat mitzvah, and sang in the religious school choir at the temple. Previously …

An Illuminating Path at the Crossroads of Sefarad

By Jenny Silber When you think of what it means to be Jewish, lox and bagels on a Sunday morning or matzah ball soup on Passover may be some of the first things to come to mind. The commonality of sharing these traditions can make us feel like we know a Jewish person before we …

Meet Our New Rabbinical Intern Emma Dubin

By Erica Slutsky | Communications Manager Tell us a bit about your background, education, and training. What led to you Temple Emanu-El? I’m a rising third-year rabbinical student at HUC-JIR (Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion) New York. In between undergrad and rabbinical school, I worked in development for the Central Conference of American Rabbis, …

Shabbat Service

Shabbat services at Temple Emanu-El are held Friday evenings at 6 PM (EST/EDT) and Saturday mornings at 10:30 AM. An organ recital precedes Friday evening services, starting at 5:45 PM, and Saturday morning services, starting at 10:15 AM. An oneg Shabbat follows all Friday evening services.

Services are held in our Fifth Avenue Sanctuary. Enter at Fifth Avenue and 65th Street.

All services are broadcast on both Facebook and our website’s broadcast page.

Sabbath Eve Lay-Led Union Prayer Book Minyan

Gather with friends old and new for a contemplative welcoming of the Sabbath, prior to our service in the Fifth Avenue Sanctuary. If you have questions or are interested in volunteering to read on future dates, contact Dr. Frederick Roden at .

Sabbath Eve Lay-Led Union Prayer

Gather with friends old and new for a contemplative welcoming of the Sabbath, prior to our service in the Fifth Avenue Sanctuary. If you have questions or are interested in volunteering to read on future dates, contact Dr. Frederick Roden at .

Morning of Shavuot, Yizkor Memorial Service: Online

In order to protect our community from the spread of COVID-19, Temple Emanu-El will exclusively broadcast upcoming services in real-time on both Facebook and our website’s broadcast page.

To view our website’s broadcast page: click here

To view our Facebook page: click here

For more information on how you can connect to Temple Emanu-El throughout this difficult time, please see our Emanu-El At Home page.


From the Hebrew word for “weeks,” Shavuot is a reference to the seven weeks it took for the Jews to travel from Egypt to the foot of Mount Sinai and the declaration of the 50th day as a holy convocation (Leviticus 23:21). It is customary on Shavuot to read the section of the Torah that defines the Ten Commandments (which Moses received at Mount Sinai), as well as the Book of Ruth (which is a testament to loyalty, devotion and the act of conversion to Judaism) and passages from Psalms (which are credited to David, King of Israel and the great-grandson of Ruth.) Shavuot also is one of the four times during the year when we mourn together (Yizkor) and recite the memorial prayers in remembrance of those whom we have loved and lost. Interestingly, it is said that David was born on Shavuot and died on Shavuot.

Several culinary traditions are associated with Shavuot: having two challot (one for each tablet of the Ten Commandments) and the eating of dairy treats, specifically cheesecake and blintzes (references to the sweetness of Torah and a “land of milk and honey”). In addition, many Reform congregations celebrate with a ceremony of confirmation on Shavuot — a tradition started in Germany in 1810 and introduced in North America in 1847 by Temple Emanu-El.

Along with Shavuot Services, this morning will also include a Yizkor Memorial Service.

Eve of Shavuot and Confirmation: Online Service

In order to protect our community from the spread of COVID-19, Temple Emanu-El will exclusively broadcast upcoming services in real-time on both Facebook and our website’s broadcast page.

To view our website’s broadcast page: click here

To view our Facebook page: click here

For more information on how you can connect to Temple Emanu-El throughout this difficult time, please see our Emanu-El At Home page.


From the Hebrew word for “weeks,” Shavuot is a reference to the seven weeks it took for the Jews to travel from Egypt to the foot of Mount Sinai and the declaration of the 50th day as a holy convocation (Leviticus 23:21). It is customary on Shavuot to read the section of the Torah that defines the Ten Commandments (which Moses received at Mount Sinai), as well as the Book of Ruth (which is a testament to loyalty, devotion and the act of conversion to Judaism) and passages from Psalms (which are credited to David, King of Israel and the great-grandson of Ruth.) Shavuot also is one of the four times during the year when we mourn together (Yizkor) and recite the memorial prayers in remembrance of those whom we have loved and lost. Interestingly, it is said that David was born on Shavuot and died on Shavuot.

Several culinary traditions are associated with Shavuot: having two challot (one for each tablet of the Ten Commandments) and the eating of dairy treats, specifically cheesecake and blintzes (references to the sweetness of Torah and a “land of milk and honey”). In addition, many Reform congregations celebrate with a ceremony of confirmation on Shavuot — a tradition started in Germany in 1810 and introduced in North America in 1847 by Temple Emanu-El.

Along with Shavuot Services, this evening will also include Confirmation, as our high-school-aged students’ reaffirm their commitment to embracing Jewish learning and tradition in their lives. Leading the congregation in worship and sharing their beliefs with the community is a rite of passage they will remember forever, and we hope you will be part of this meaningful occasion. Please join us.

 

 

Online Conclusion of Passover – Morning Service

In order to protect our community from the spread of COVID-19, Temple Emanu-El will exclusively broadcast upcoming services in real-time on both Facebook and our website’s broadcast page.

For more information on how you can connect to Temple Emanu-El throughout this difficult time, please see our Emanu-El At Home page.


We invite you to join us online for a morning service as we mark the conclusion of Passover. Please note, the morning service on April 15 will include a Yizkor/Memorial service. It is one of four times each year when we mourn together (Yizkor) and recite the memorial prayers to remember those whom we have loved and lost.

This service will be livestreamed here.

To learn more about Passover, click here.

Online Conclusion of Passover – Evening Service

In order to protect our community from the spread of COVID-19, Temple Emanu-El will exclusively broadcast upcoming services in real-time on both Facebook and our website’s broadcast page.

For more information on how you can connect to Temple Emanu-El throughout this difficult time, please see our Emanu-El At Home page.


We invite you to join us for an online service as we mark the conclusion of Passover. Please note that the evening service will NOT include a Yizkor/Memorial service.

This service will be livestreamed here.

To learn more about Passover, click here.

Purim

The Purim story is told in the Scroll of Esther (M’gillat Esther), named for a Jewish woman who becomes Queen of Persia and puts herself in jeopardy by approaching the king without being summoned, in an attempt to save her fellow Jews from extermination. Purim at Emanu-El is celebrated with a spirited reading of the Megillah by our clergy for adult members, a shpiel and carnival for families the following day, and plenty of hamantaschen.

For more information, consult our High Holy Days Guide.