Yom Kippur Study Sessions

After the Yom Kippur morning service we invite you to learn, study and reflect in a session led by scholars of the temple. Participation is open to all congregants and guests. Sessions are held from 12:30 to 1:30 PM. Locations will be announced soon.


SIN IN A DIGITAL AGE
Rabbi Rachel Gross-Prinz
Technology and the internet have opened up our world. How do they impact our moral compass?
What do repentance and forgiveness look like in an age of hyper-connection and virtual relationship?
How can ancient texts guide this modern context?

WHY YIZKOR MATTERS
Rabbi Bruce Block
We will explore the origins of Yizkor, its power to draw us to the synagogue, its potential to be a healing balm, and the restorative effect of being present for Yizkor in our congregation and community.

EXPLORING THE ARTWORK OF OUR NEW PRAYERBOOK & NINETY YEARS ON THE CORNER OF 65TH STREET AND FIFTH AVENUE
Warren Klein, Bernard Museum Curator
Take a closer look at some of the artwork featured in our new holiday prayerbook. We will look at the architectural design elements as well as examine many never before seen and recently digitized documents, photographs and papers from the temple’s archive celebrating the ninetieth anniversary of our main sanctuary and community house.

DO PEOPLE CHANGE?
Rabbi Joseph Skloot
On this momentous day, explore a range of Jewish texts about whether human beings can change and how. What are the possibilities for us and for our relationships in the New Year and what can we do to make them realities.

WHY DO WE CALL YOM KIPPUR THE SABBATH OF SABBATHS?
Rabbi Phil Hiat
In the Torah, Yom Kippur is called Shabbat Shabbaton, “Sabbath of Sabbaths.” Why does the day of atonement earn this title?

THE STRANGE CASE OF A MYSTERIOUS DAY: WHAT REALLY HAPPENS ON YOM KIPPUR?
Rabbi Richard Davis
When they looked at the real world, our Rabbis questioned how an incorporeal God could possibly bring about forgiveness in physical humans.  They looked to personal action as an answer.  Talmud, Tractate Yoma (The Day) 85a, asks if the mere passage of Yom Kippur and its spirituality is enough to generate purified humans.  In this session we will consider the Talmud’s proposal and how the later philosophers, Maimonides and Levinas, interpreted the Sages.  I will also refer to my study The Philosophy of Civility: A Current Concern.